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[Note 100.0] 

The only instance of this song found to date is on the broadside(1). The references to places in Ireland suggest that it may have been written by an Irish resident of Liverpool.

[Note 100.1] "The wonderful Great Britain" :- SS Great Britain was launched 1843. She was the longest passenger ship in the world from 1845 to 1854 and the first to use a propeller rather than paddle wheels. [ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Great_Britain]

[Note 100.2 "For diving in the sand banks " :- In September 1846, after narrowly missing some rocks she ran ashore on the beach in Dundrum Bay. Below - SS Great Britain, beached ashore, Dundrum Bay Ireland, at high water and in a gale by Joseph Walter.

[Note 100.3] "From Liverpool she did set sail...that off to Ireland brought her" :- The accident happened at the start of a routine transatlantic voyage from Liverpool.

[Note 100.4] "Dundrum Bay " :- Is on the coast of Ulster south of Belfast.

[Note 100.5] "Dungannon" :- A town in Ulster. Many miles inland.

[Note 100.6] "Bog of Allen" :- About 50 kilometers inland west of Dublin

[Note 100.7] "There was pick-a-ninnys and fan-dangs" :- . It was common for black adults to be treated as children. the Piccaninnies might have been black entertainers like C.W. Pell's Serenaders shown in the Vauxhall Gardens advertisement below. There would almost certainly have been aristocrats among the passengers.

[Note 100.8] "Van Amburgh's strolling players " :- Isaac A. Van Amburgh (1811–1865) was an American animal trainer who developed the first trained wild animal act in modern times. During the mid-1840s his was the largest traveling show in England. He performed for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert  [ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_A._Van_Amburgh]The advertisement below comes from the Illustrated London News 5th August 1848. No evidence has come to light to suggest that he was on board the Great Britain when she grounded.

[Note 100.9] "The noble Capt. Hoken" :- Captain James Hosken

[Note 100.10] "the devil take the lighthouse" :- The Captain mistook St John's Point light for the Chicken Rock light on the Isle of Man

[Note 100.11] "The President great steamship " :- The SS President was commissioned in 1840. She was lost in the Atlantic in 1841; five years before Great Britain Ashore was written which makes this reference to her rather macabre.  See bar247~President Steam Ship

[Note 100.12] "Castle Hyde" :- about 25 Kilometers north of Cork

[Note 100.13] "As think that ever she'll get clear, For in the mud she's stuck fast" :- She was not was re-floated until in August 1847.

[Note 100.14] "When she is in the graving dock, Just close the gates for ever, Or else she'll fly clean off the stocks" :- Graving Dock: An artificial basin excavated, built round with masonry, and fitted with flood-gates, into which ships are received for purposes of loading and unloading or for repair.  Stocks : The framework on which a ship or boat is supported while in process of construction [OED]

[Note 100.14] "Warren's Pint" :- Warrenpoint is a small town in County Down, Northern Ireland. It lies on the northern shore of Carlingford Lough. Great Britain was taken back to Liverpool for refitting.

 

 

 

 

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